Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

“Many hands make light work”


Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

By putting the right things in the right place, relationships develop between them and they support each other.

This icon represents a group of people from a bird’s-eye view, holding hands in a circle together. The space in the centre could represent “the whole being greater than the sum of the parts”. The proverb “many hands make light work” suggests that when we work together the job becomes easier.

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Keeping our elders with us

The funeral service for Venie Holmgren at Poets Corner, Melliodora is where she spent the last four years of her long life in the house her son David built for her. Construction of the casket at a neighbours workshop helped her son and grandson heal through the process. The poetry collage came from her published works and those of her poet colleagues. The story of the casket, funeral and Venie’s long life reveal the layers of integration that bind us to those who have passed on.

‘Keeping our elders with us’ taken at Melliodora, Australia by Bruce Hedge and features in the 2017 Permaculture Calendar.


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Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

Planting for the future

Young Verdi helps her dad plant a Campbell Orange tree at their recently purchased property, in recognition of the summer solstice, using her own set of small tools. Her parents try to involve her in as many chores and projects as possible: from feeding the animals, working in the garden and planting trees to shelling beans.  It allows the business of developing and maintaining the property to continue, at a slower pace perhaps, while teaching important life skills at the same time.

Photo taken by Dani Lebo

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate - No fuss shiitake

No fuss shiitake

Ashar inspects a harvest from shiitake logs in the shade house, where perennial seedlings and cuttings are propagated. Underneath the benches is a great spot for shiitake logs. It’s shady, has great airflow, gets humidified daily via the misting of the plants and is kept moist by the excess water falling from the seedling trays above. Traditionally, oak, willow and poplar logs are used, but at Milkwood Farm eucalypts are what is available, so they work with what they’ve got.

Photo contributed by Kirsten Bradley

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate - Building strength and trust within groups (NSW Australia)

Building strength and trust within groups

The importance of collaborative processes is often ignored because of the urgency of direct action. Groups can work more successfully together when participants are engaged and feel connected, bringing better outcomes in the long term. Robin Clayfield (centre) initiates a group handshake at the end of her dynamic decision making workshop that supports everyone in the group to meet, discuss and make decisions in a more effective, inclusive and empowering way.

Photo contributed by Robyn Rosenfeldt. See People and Permaculture and Getting Our Act Together for more about working with groups.

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate - Seeds

Seeds

In indigenous cultures there is no separation between earth, people and culture. These girls begin their dance as dormant seeds ready to sprout and grow, as the girls themselves will flourish and become women through living a connected and interactive life with their country and people.

Text by Michele Margolis, photo of members of the Jannawi Dance Theatre by Michelle Blakeney

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

The chicken solution

A waste audit at Wilkins Public School measured compostable waste at 25 kg per day. The school community and TAFE Outreach responded by building a large chook run in the garden. The much loved hens now live a well fed existence, recycling garden waste and food scraps into fertilizer and eggs. Wilkins Green is for school, pre-school and TAFE use. Here Milele and Jaali embrace their role as caretakers.

Photo taken at Wilkins Green, Australia and contributed by Leonie McNamara

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

Making spaces into places

City planning has tended to cultivate disconnection between people, and from the natural world. City Repair reclaims urban spaces to create community-oriented places. Localisation of culture, economy, decision-making, food supply and material needs is a necessary foundation for sustainability. “We are all villagers at heart.” [Brian Friel]

Celebratory bike ride photo taken at the Village Building Convergence, Portland, Oregon and contributed by Joel Catchlove

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

Cook together, learn together, laugh together

The Seven Stars is a food based social enterprise at CERES in Melbourne operated by Turkish and Kurdish women. Making use of seasonal peaks in locally grown organic produce, the Seven Stars create a delicious range of products and catering that showcase the women’s food traditions. The most peaceful communities are those that embrace human diversity, and that are connected by food grown, cooked and shared with love.

Text contributed by Michele Margolis, photo by Lindi Huntsman.

Principle 8: Integrate rather than segregate

Eating the school gardens

Students are continuously sharing the food from their school garden which they designed and built with the school community. We have a harvest celebration, a bringing together of all classes to harvest the fresh organic produce, cook and share a meal together, a meal full of health, colour, flavour and students’ pride. Everything we do within the Edible School Gardens program is integrated – it is all in a cycle, nothing wasted, all systems supporting each other.

Photo contributed by Di Harris and text by Leonie Shanahan

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